Affluence and Influence: Economic Inequality and Political Power in America

With support from the Foundation, Martin Gilens, Professor of Politics at Princeton University, has been studying economic inequality and political power in the United States. His project, entitled "Inequality and Democratic Responsiveness," relates policy preferences expressed by low, middle, and high income Americans with actual federal policymaking between 1964 and 2006. Gilens' analyses show enormous …

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U.S. Foreign Economic and Military Aid by Major Recipient Country: 2001 – 2009

It needs to be said: the United States supports dictators! There is no greater example than by looking at the country of Egypt. Egypt just finished toppling a dictator (Mubarak) who has been receiving substancial militaty aid for years, second only to Israel in the Middle East. Take a look at the numbers: In millions of dollars (16,836 represents …

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The Radicalism of the American Revolution

The “meaning” of the American Revolution has been hotly debated for more than 200 years. For some, it is a conservative effort by planters to seize power and control the development of a society already divided between slaves and free men, whites and non-whites, and the landed and the landless. For others, it represents a …

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From Lexington and Concord to Yorktown

This outline covers the fighting during the American Revolution from Lexington and Concord to the British surrender at Yorktown in 1781. The victory of the American colonists is an extraordinary story of a small group of colonials challenging and defeating the most powerful empire in the world. This victory was made possible by the larger …

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The “North” American Revolution Emerges

This outline begins with a brief survey of the 13 colonies, including their origins, similarities, and differences. I stress the contingency and uncertainty of the colonists’ development as a unified group of peoples. This sense of unity emerges out of a series of colonial wars that the English fought, especially with the French in the …

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Nicaragua: The First Real American Coup

During the last decades of the nineteenth century, the ideals of social and political reform swept across Central America. Visionary leaders, inspired by European philosophers and nation builders, sought to wipe away the feudal systems that had frozen their countries into immobility. One of them, President José Santos Zelaya of Nicaragua, took his nationalist principles …

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