A Summary of “The Great Leveler” by Walter Scheidel

Walter Scheidel, an Austrian historian from Stanford University has taken time off from his main interest (the Romans) to write a powerful, and pretty depressing, book on inequality. His book is called The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the 21st Century. Its argument is: For thousands of …

Continue reading A Summary of “The Great Leveler” by Walter Scheidel

Advertisements

Slave Masters: A Quick Note on the First Aristocracy of the U.S.

Hi, Sharing a quick historical example of how a small group of persons can easily control the actions and fate of millions. This example is historically and academically interesting to me. In the first half of the 19th century, the largest single industry in the United States, measured in terms of both market capital and …

Continue reading Slave Masters: A Quick Note on the First Aristocracy of the U.S.

The Case for Reparations

The Case for Reparations by Ta-Nehisi Coates - The Atlantic: Two hundred fifty years of slavery. Ninety years of Jim Crow. Sixty years of separate but equal. Thirty-five years of racist housing policy. Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole. Clyde Ross was born in 1923, the seventh of …

Continue reading The Case for Reparations

The Many Councils of Christ: How Christianity was Created in Closed-door Meetings

Christianity was created and defined by men in closed-door meetings. Below is a chronology of some important Councils which gave us the version of Christianity that we know today: Council of Elvira Council of Elvira (304) was the first written mandate requiring priests to be celibate. It also made laws with maintained the separation of Jews and …

Continue reading The Many Councils of Christ: How Christianity was Created in Closed-door Meetings

Napoleon Invades Spain and Portugal

Although the processes of modernization and reform set the stage for the wars for independence, it was the Napoleonic wars, and more specifically, Napoleon’s invasion of Spain, that triggered the wars for independence in Spanish America. This outline first looks at the rise of Napoleon and his efforts to dominate Europe. We then closely examine …

Continue reading Napoleon Invades Spain and Portugal

The Athletes of God

Before the conversion of Constantine, martyrs and confessors (those who professed their Christian faith to Roman officials in the expectation of martyrdom) were Christianity’s heroes and spiritual elite. Martyrdom and openly professing one’s faith before Roman officials were supremely meritorious actions. They were the equivalent of a second baptism, fully atoning for a person’s past …

Continue reading The Athletes of God

Jesus Outside the Bible: Part 3 – Pliny, Tacitus and Suetonius

There are three Greco-Roman pagan passages extremely important to the defenders of the Christian myth. They are the works of three major non-Christian writers of the late 1st and early 2nd centuries – Tacitus, Suetonius, and Pliny the Younger. Let’s closely examine these passages and see why they cannot serve us as justification for reliable …

Continue reading Jesus Outside the Bible: Part 3 – Pliny, Tacitus and Suetonius