//
you're reading...
Politics

On The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961

The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961 is the most subscribed single international treaty in the world which has enabled diplomatic relations to properly function throughout the world.

The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961 is an international treaty that defines a framework for diplomatic relations between independent countries. It specifies the privileges of a diplomatic mission that enable diplomats to perform their function without fear of coercion or harassment by the host country. This forms the legal basis for diplomatic immunity. Its articles are considered a cornerstone of modern international relations.

The treaty is an extensive document, containing 53 articles. Following is a basic overview of its key provisions. For a comprehensive enumeration of all articles, consult the original text.

  • Article 9. The host nation may at any time and for any reason declare a particular member of the diplomatic staff to be persona non grata. The sending state must recall this person within a reasonable period of time, or otherwise this person may lose their diplomatic immunity.
  • Article 22. The premises of a diplomatic mission, such as an embassy, are inviolate and must not be entered by the host country except by permission of the head of the mission. Furthermore, the host country must protect the mission from intrusion or damage. The host country must never search the premises, nor seize its documents or property. Article 30 extends this provision to the private residence of the diplomats.
  • Article 27. The host country must permit and protect free communication between the diplomats of the mission and their home country. A diplomatic bag must never be opened even on suspicion of abuse. A diplomatic courier must never be arrested or detained.
  • Article 29. Diplomats must not be liable to any form of arrest or detention. They are immune from civil or criminal prosecution, though the sending country may waive this right under Article 32. Under Article 34, they are exempt from most taxes, and under Article 36 they are exempt from most customs duties.
  • Article 37. The family members of a diplomat that are living in the host country enjoy most of the same protections as the diplomats themselves.

Now that we know a little about this very important convention, keep your eyes out for those who attempt to undermine these principles.

Notes:

 

Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 1961: http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_1_1961.pdf

 

 

About elpidiovaldes

Human, All Too Human.

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: